Sorbitol Cataract: Signs, Causes and Treatment

Sorbitol Cataract: Signs, Causes and Treatment

If you are like most people, you have probably never heard of the term “sorbitol cataract.” This is because this type of cataract is relatively rare. However, if you happen to develop one, you must understand what it is and how it can be treated. In this blog post, we will discuss sorbitol cataracts in detail. We will explain what they are, how they form, and how they can be treated. We will also provide a few tips for prevention.

What is Sorbitol Cataract?

What is Sorbitol Cataract?

Sorbitol cataract is a type of cataract that is caused by the accumulation of sorbitol in the lens of the eye. Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol found naturally in many fruits and vegetables. It is also used as a sweetener in many processed foods and drinks.

Sorbitol cataracts usually develop slowly and may not be noticeable until later in life. They are more common in people with diabetes or other conditions that cause high levels of blood sugar.

The history of social cataract surgery is relatively short. The first reported cases were in the 1970s, but the condition was not well-understood at that time. It was not until the 1990s that surgeons began to recognize sorbitol cataracts as a distinct type of cataract and develop methods to treat them.

People with sorbitol cataracts typically require surgery to remove the affected lens. In most cases, the surgery is successful and the person’s vision returns to normal.

Symptoms of Sorbitol Cataract

There are many symptoms of orbital cataracts. However, the most common symptom is blurred vision. Other symptoms include:

Glare

This is one of the signs of early cataracts. When the cataract first develops, you may notice that light seems too bright or that glare is more common than before. This can make driving at night more difficult. When you see headlights coming toward you, they may appear to have a halo around them.

Poor Night Vision

As the cataract matures, you may start to experience more difficulty seeing at night. This is because the cataract blocks are lighter and lighter from reaching your retina. You may find yourself needing to use more light to see things clearly or needing more time to adjust when going from a lighted area to a dark one.

Fading Colors

Cataracts can also cause colors to seem faded. You may notice that whites look yellowish and that greens and blues appear muted. This is because the cataract is filtering out some of the colors in the visible spectrum. This sign also becomes more noticeable as the cataract matures.

Double Vision

One of the more serious symptoms of cataracts is double vision. This happens when the cataract blocks light from reaching both eyes equally. As a result, you may see two images of everything instead of just one. If you experience this symptom, it’s important to see your doctor right away so they can determine if surgery is necessary.

Frequent changes in eyeglass prescription

If you have a cataract, you may find that your eyeglass or contact lens prescription changes more often than it did in the past. This sign also becomes more noticeable as the cataract matures.

Constant Eye-discomfort

This is one of the most common symptoms of a sorbitol cataract. You might feel like there’s something in your eye, or that your eyes are excessively dry. These symptoms can be aggravated by wind, dust, or smoke.

Constant Headaches

Another common symptom of a sorbitol cataract is constant headaches. These headaches are usually dull and throbbing and can be accompanied by nausea and vomiting. Sometimes there may be many different things going on and a headache can be just one symptom of several.

Sorbitol Cataract v/s Other Types of Cataract

Sorbitol Cataract Other Types of Cataract

Sorbitol cataract is a type of cataract that is caused by the accumulation of sorbitol in the lens of the eye. Also, Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol that is found in many fruits and vegetables. It is also used as an artificial sweetener in some food products.

Sorbitol cataracts are different from other types of cataracts because they tend to develop slowly and progress over time. They are also more difficult to treat with surgery than other types of cataracts.

Another difference between Sorbitol cataracts with other types of cataracts is that people with diabetes are more likely to develop sorbitol cataracts. This is because high levels of blood sugar can lead to the accumulation of sorbitol in the lens of the eye.

Another difference that separates Sorbitol cataracts from others is that they are more common in women than men. This is because estrogen levels can increase the risk of developing sorbitol cataracts. Another difference that sets Sorbitol cataracts apart is that they are more common in people of Asian descent.

Causes of Sorbitol Cataract

There are many causes of sorbitol cataracts, but the most common cause is diabetes. When blood sugar levels are high, the body produces sorbitol as a way to metabolize glucose. Sorbitol is then excreted in the urine, and it can also build up in the lens of the eye. This accumulation of sorbitol causes the lens to swell and become cloudy.

Other causes of sorbitol cataracts include:

Aging

Aging is a natural process that causes the body to produce fewer enzymes. As we age, the production of these enzymes decreases, and sorbitol begins to build up in the lens of the eye. Sometimes there may be many other cataract-causing factors at work in the elderly, such as poor diet and dehydration.

Prolonged Exposure to Ultraviolet (UV) Light

Exposure to UV light can damage the DNA of cells, causing them to die. When these damaged cells accumulate in the lens of the eye, they can cause a sorbitol cataract.

Trauma

An injury to the eye can cause bleeding and swelling, which can lead to the formation of a sorbitol cataract.

Diseases

Certain diseases, such as galactosemia and glycogen storage disease type II, can also cause sorbitol cataracts. In these cases, the buildup of sorbitol is due to a defect in the metabolism of these sugars.

Diabetes

An uncontrolled diabetic can have high levels of glucose in their blood. When this happens, the body produces sorbitol as a way to metabolize glucose. Sorbitol is then excreted in the urine, and it can also build up in the lens of the eye. This accumulation of sorbitol causes the lens to swell and become cloudy.

Side Effects of Sorbitol Cataract

Side Effects of Sorbitol Cataract

There are many side effects of Sorbitol cataracts. Some of these include:

Dryness In Eyes

This is one of the most common side effects of Sorbitol. People who suffer from dry eyes may experience a burning sensation, itchiness, and redness. The symptoms can be very uncomfortable and may make it difficult to wear contact lenses or perform daily activities.

Damage to the Cornea

The cornea is the transparent, outer layer of the eye. It can become damaged from Sorbitol exposure. Symptoms of corneal damage include pain, redness, watering, blurred vision, and sensitivity to light. If left untreated, corneal damage can lead to blindness.

Increased Intraocular Pressure

Intraocular pressure is the pressure inside the eye. Sorbitol can increase intraocular pressure, which can lead to glaucoma. Glaucoma is a serious condition that can cause blindness. Symptoms of glaucoma include severe headaches, nausea, vomiting, and loss of vision. If you experience any of these symptoms, you should see a doctor immediately.

Constant Tearing

Sorbitol can also cause the eyes to tear constantly. This can be very annoying and may make it difficult to see. It can also lead to eye infections if the tears are not cleaned away properly. There can also be many other side effects of Sorbitol, including headaches, dizziness, fatigue, and gastrointestinal problems. If you experience any of these side effects, you should see a doctor immediately.

Diagnosis of Sorbitol Cataract

If you are noticing an increase in your vision problems, and suspect that you may have a sorbitol cataract, it is important to get evaluated by a doctor as soon as possible. Sorbitol cataracts can be difficult to diagnose, but some key signs may suggest the condition is present.

The most common symptom of a sorbitol cataract is a gradual deterioration of your vision. You may notice that objects start to look blurry or indistinct and that colors seem to fade. In severe cases, you may even lose all your sight in one or both eyes.

To diagnose a sorbitol cataract, your doctor will first ask about your symptoms and medical history. He or she will also perform a physical exam and take photos of your eye for diagnostic purposes. If the diagnosis is confirmed, your doctor may recommend surgery to remove the cataractous lens.

How is Sorbitol Cataract Treated?

How is Sorbitol Cataract Treated?

Treating sorbitol cataracts involves removing the lens of the eye through surgery. This is a very delicate process, so it’s important to find an experienced surgeon who can perform the procedure. After the lens is removed, you will need to wear glasses or contact lenses to correct your vision. In some cases, you may also need to have surgery on your cornea.

The other treatment options are:

  • Wear contact lenses or glasses to correct your vision.
  • Surgery on your cornea.

Treatment depends on the severity of your cataract and how much it is affecting your vision. If you have a mild cataract, you may not need treatment. But if your cataract is more severe, surgery may be the best option.

If you have a sorbitol cataract, it’s important to see an eye doctor regularly so they can monitor the progression of your condition and recommend treatment if necessary. Sorbitol cataracts are usually treatable with surgery, so don’t delay in getting help if you think you may have this condition.

Conclusion

Sorbitol cataracts are a type of cataract that can develop as a result of diabetes. They are typically small and hard to see on an eye exam, but they can cause vision problems if they grow large enough. Treatment for sorbitol cataracts typically involves surgery to remove the affected lens. If you have diabetes, it is important to control your blood sugar levels and visit your eye doctor regularly to check for cataracts.

While sorbitol cataracts are not common, they can be serious if left untreated. If you have diabetes, make sure to keep your blood sugar under control and visit your eye doctor regularly for checkups. If you notice any changes in your vision, be sure to mention them to your doctor. With proper treatment, you can protect your vision and maintain a clear vision for years to come.

Cataract surgery is a safe and painless procedure. At EyeMantra we have a team of experienced eye surgeons, who will be happy to answer your questions on cataract surgery, cataract surgery cost, and cataract lens cost for different cataract surgery types- Phacoemulsification, MICS & Femto Laser Cataract. Call us at +91-9711116605 or email at [email protected] for inquiries.