MICS Cataract Surgery : Detailed Guide on MICS Cataract Surgery

MICS Cataract Surgery : Detailed Guide on MICS Cataract Surgery

If you are one of the millions of people who suffer from cataracts, you may be interested in MICS cataract surgery. This surgery is a newer procedure that has been growing in popularity over the past few years. This blog post will discuss everything you need to know about MICS cataract surgery. We will cover what the surgery is, how it is performed, and what the recovery process is like. If you are considering having this surgery done, make sure to read this blog post!

What is MICS Cataract Surgery?

What is MICS Cataract Surgery?

MICS cataract surgery is a newer procedure that has been growing in popularity over the past few years. This surgery is performed using a small incision, which is why it is also known as “micro-incision cataract surgery.” The surgery is performed to remove the cataract from the eye, and it typically takes about 30 minutes to complete.

The history of this procedure dates back to the early 1990s when it was first used in animals. The first human surgery was performed in 2001, and it has been growing in popularity ever since. The main reason for this is that the surgery can be done using a very small incision. This means that there is less risk of complication and a quicker recovery time.

People may use this surgery for a variety of reasons. The most common reason is to improve vision that has been affected by a cataract. In some cases, people may also use this surgery to correct other vision problems, such as astigmatism.

MICS cataract surgery is typically done on an outpatient basis. This means that you will not have to stay in the hospital overnight after the surgery. You will be able to go home the same day.

Who is a Candidate for MICS Cataract Surgery?

Being a candidate for MICS Cataract Surgery is depending on the condition.

Theoretically, any patient with cataracts can undergo MICS surgery. However, the procedure is most commonly used in patients who have had previous refractive surgery or who have corneal changes that limit their ability to achieve the best possible visual results from a traditional microincision procedure.

MICS cataract surgery can also be used in cases where there are small, hard-to-remove cataracts that have been resistant to previous attempts at removing them. In some cases, it may also be used as an alternative to LASIK for certain vision correction patients, such as those with very thin corneas.

Other cases where MICS cataract surgery may be recommended include:

Patients with diabetic retinopathy (an eye condition that can lead to blindness)

One of the most common reasons that MICS surgery is performed these days is to improve vision in patients who have diabetic retinopathy. This disease causes changes in the blood vessels of the retina (the back part of the eye), which can lead to vision loss.

Patients who have had previous refractive surgery (such as LASIK or PRK)

Refractive surgery is surgery that is done to correct vision problems such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. MICS cataract surgery can be used in cases where refractive surgery has not achieved the desired results or in cases where the patient has developed complications from previous refractive surgery.

Patients with corneal changes

Corneal changes can occur for a variety of reasons, such as injury, disease, or aging. These changes can sometimes make it difficult to achieve the best possible visual results from traditional cataract surgery. MICS surgery may be recommended in these cases.

People with small, hard-to-remove cataracts

In some cases, people may develop cataracts that are small and hard to remove. MICS surgery can be used to remove these types of cataracts. Sometimes, this surgery may also be used as an alternative to traditional cataract surgery in cases where the patient is not a good candidate for traditional surgery.

What Happens During MICS Cataract Surgery?

What Happens During MICS Cataract Surgery?

MICS cataract surgery is typically performed on an outpatient basis, which means that you will not have to stay in the hospital overnight. The surgery itself only takes about 15 minutes to complete.

During MICS cataract surgery, your surgeon will make a tiny incision in your eye — usually just 2.4 mm wide. This is about one-tenth the size of a traditional incision for cataract surgery. Once the incision is made, your surgeon will insert a miniature instrument called a phacoemulsification probe into your eye. This probe uses ultrasound waves to break up the cataract so that it can be removed.

After the cataract has been removed, your surgeon will place a new intraocular lens (IOL) in your eye. This is the part of the surgery that replaces your natural lens. In most cases, you will not need stitches after MICS cataract surgery.

Also, the procedure is done through a small incision, usually 2.4 mm, which is about 10% the size of a traditional cataract surgery incision. A miniature instrument called a phacoemulsification probe uses ultrasound waves to break up and remove the cataract. After the cataract has been removed, your surgeon will place a new intraocular lens (IOL) in your eye. In most cases, you will not need stitches after MICS cataract surgery.

What Are The Benefits of MICS Cataract Surgery?

MICS cataract surgery has several benefits over traditional cataract surgery. These benefits include:

Quicker Recovery Time

One of the most common complaints after traditional cataract surgery is the length of time it takes to recover. With MICS, however, patients can expect a much quicker recovery. In most cases, patients can return to their normal activities within a day or two. Also, because MICS is a much less invasive procedure, there is often less pain and discomfort associated with it.

Reduced Risk of Complications

Another benefit of MICS is that it generally has a lower complication rate than traditional cataract surgery. This is because MICS is less invasive and uses smaller incisions. Additionally, because MICS does not require sutures, there is a decreased risk of infection.

Improved Visual Outcomes

MICS also generally results in better visual outcomes than traditional cataract surgery. This is because MICS leaves the cornea intact, which helps to preserve its natural shape. Also, because MICS uses smaller incisions, there is less trauma to the eye, which leads to a faster and more complete healing process.

Helped Recovery from Traditional Cataract Surgery

While MICS cataract surgery has many benefits, one of its most important benefits is that it can help to improve the recovery process of traditional cataract surgery. In some cases, patients who have undergone traditional cataract surgery may experience complications that can delay or even prevent their vision from returning to normal. However, by undergoing MICS cataract surgery, these patients can often achieve better results.

Techniques of MICS Cataract Surgery

Techniques of MICS Cataract Surgery

There are many techniques of MICS cataract surgery, but they all share one common goal: to minimize trauma to the eye while still providing excellent visual outcomes. Some of these techniques are:

Phacoemulsification

One of the most common techniques that are used in MICS cataract surgery is phacoemulsification. This technique uses a high-frequency ultrasonic probe to break up the cataract into small pieces, which are then suctioned out of the eye. Phacoemulsification is a very effective technique and has been shown to provide excellent visual outcomes.

Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS)

An exciting new development in cataract surgery is the use of a femtosecond laser. This type of laser has been used for refractive surgery, such as LASIK, for many years and has only recently been approved by the FDA for use in cataract surgery. Femtosecond lasers allow the surgeon to create incisions with much greater precision than is possible with traditional methods. Additionally, the use of a femtosecond laser can help to preserve more of the surrounding tissue, which may result in fewer complications and a quicker recovery.

Monofocal IOL Implantation

Mono-focal intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is the most common type of cataract surgery. In this procedure, the surgeon will make a small incision in your eye and remove the cloudy natural lens. Once the natural lens is removed, an IOL will be inserted in its place. The IOL that is chosen will be based on your individual vision needs.

The most common type of IOL is a monofocal lens, which means that it corrects for either nearsightedness or farsightedness, but not both. This means that you will likely still need to wear glasses or contact lenses after surgery to see clearly at all distances.

Multifocal IOL Implantation

This type of IOL corrects vision at multiple distances. It’s especially helpful for people who don’t want to wear glasses after surgery. A disadvantage of multifocal IOLs is that they may cause more visual side effects, such as halos or glare, than monofocal IOLs. This type of IOL is implanted during cataract surgery, in which your natural lens is removed and replaced with an IOL.

Extended Depth-Of-Focus (EDOF) IOL Implantation

An EDOF IOL provides a continuous range of intermediate vision in addition to distance and near vision, which may decrease your dependence on glasses. This type of IOL is also known as a presbyopia-correcting IOL or a multifocal IOL.

Like other types of IOLs, an EDOF IOL is surgically implanted in the eye during cataract surgery. The surgeon makes a tiny incision in the eye and then inserts the IOL through this opening. Once the IOL is in place, it helps to focus light on the retina — the light-sensitive layer of tissue at the back of the eye — so that you can see clearly.

Are There Any Risks Associated with MICS Cataract Surgery?

Are There Any Risks Associated with MICS Cataract Surgery?

Many risks are associated with any kind of surgery, such as infection, bleeding, or reaction to anesthesia. There are also risks specific to this type of surgery, which include:

• Corneal edema – This is when the clear front surface of the eye swells from too much fluid. It usually goes away on its own within a few days, but in some cases, it may require treatment.

• Posterior capsular opacification – This is when the back part of the lens becomes cloudy. It’s a common complication after cataract surgery and can usually be treated with laser surgery.

• Iris prolapse – This is when part of the colored tissue that surrounds the pupil (the iris) comes through the opening in the front of the eye. It usually goes back on its own, but sometimes it may require surgery to put it back in place.

• Retinal detachment – This is when the retina, which is the light-sensitive layer of tissue at the back of the eye, pulls away from the blood vessels that supply it with oxygen and nutrients. It’s a serious condition that can lead to blindness if not treated immediately.

Conclusion

MICS Cataract surgery can be an excellent option for patients with cataracts. It is minimally invasive, causes less trauma to the eye, and has a shorter recovery time than traditional surgery. MICS surgery is also associated with a lower risk of complications. If you are considering having cataract surgery, be sure to discuss your options with your doctor to determine if MICS surgery is right for you.

Cataract surgery is a safe and painless procedure. At EyeMantra we have a team of experienced eye surgeons, who will be happy to answer any questions on cataract surgerycataract surgery costcataract lens cost for different cataract surgery types- PhacoemulsificationMICS & Femto Laser Cataract. Call us at +91-9711116605 or email at [email protected] for inquiries.